Q: We're looking at a choice between buying some motors from overseas, advertised as meeting NEMA, CSA standards, versus a domestic source.  We're assured that frame size dimensions and all the electrical performace will be within Canadian standards.  Is there anything else to be concerned about? A: Two possibilites - heating curves (time versus current) that determine the electrical protection requirments: and some mechanical parts, such as fasteners, may match metric standards, and
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Cranking is the term used for the start-up sequence of the engine where the starter motor is engaged with the flywheel via the pinion and is rotating the crank shaft. The condition of the engine and other factors can prevent immediate starting due to low battery capacity, high resistance in the wires, high mileage of the engine and its condition, problems with fuel injection, and even cold weather. During the cranking process, heat is generated due to the current flowing through the unit. Th
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To give a quick overview of the function of a starter motor, once the ignition switch is turned the driver is kicked out to engage your engines flywheel. Once the flywheel turns quick enough, it nudges the driver back into the starter motor and the starter motor shuts off.   With that said, the first thing we would advise you to do is to make sure the starter motor is properly installed and lined up correctly within the engine. Check that all bolts are tightened. It should not
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So what exactly is an all electric vehicle? If you are in teh electromechanical industry will  see some familiar faces: Motor type:  Electric cars can run on either AC or DC motors. Electric traction Motor: These motors drive the vehicle's wheels using power provided by a traction battery. Traction Battery Pack: This battery stors electricity primarily for use of traction motor. Auxiliary battery: This battery provides power to areas other than the electric motor. DC converter: Co
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Not sure if motor needs repair or replaced?  Here is a quick chart.  It's a guideline only.  Please consult your motor rebuilder or technician. Courtesy by EASA.
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Someone asked about using a 230 volt motor on a 208 volt circuit.  A reply was that it should be okay because "most 230 volt three phase motors 5hp and under are designed to accept 208 or 230V..."  Isn't it true that the only standard for any horsepower rating is that standard performance applies at a terminal voltage up to 105 below the nameplate value - which is this case would be 207 volt. So 208 is okay, but according to utlity system standards the actual line voltage at the motor
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Can anybody rightfully claim to recondition or refurbish a motor so that it's literally as good as new? No. All the electrical and mechanical components undergo natural aging, augmented by thermal and mechanical stresses caused by heat, vibration, contamination and torque throughout the previouse operating life of the machine. A new winding would "start the clock" again, but that won't affect the bearings, and vice versa.  Neither replacment will directly affect shaft integrity.  Som
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A cooler running motor ought to last longer and a more efficient motor ought to run cooler.  So doesn't higher efficiency mean longer motor life? Not necessarily.  First, if by "life" you mean the time until the first repair, that's more likely to be because of a bearing failure than because of winding temperature.  Second, a more efficent motor does have lower heat-producing losses, but that also may allow use of a less robust cooling fan (meaning lower windage loss) because the
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